Archive for the ‘Blog Posts’ Category

Mortgages Part III - 15-year vs. 30-year Mortgages

Mortgages Part III – 15-year vs. 30-year Mortgages

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Personal Finance

Why are 15 year mortgages cheaper than 30 year mortgages? The answer has to do with the interest-rate curve.  Contrary to what some may believe, the economy does not have one interest rate, but rather an infinite number of market-based rates, and dozens of important benchmark rates that determine the cost of money to different [&hellip

This Guy Makes Too Much Sense

This Guy Makes Too Much Sense

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Personal Finance

In the past year I subscribed to the newsletter of an investment adviser about whom I know very little.  Pretty much every month he comes out with something awesome, and today’s newsletter was no exception.  As I’m not a client of his I can’t vouch for him as an adviser but I like the way [&hellip

Who are Bankers Anonymous Readers? June 2013 Edition

Who are Bankers Anonymous Readers? June 2013 Edition

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Texas

Stinky is the new bald Last month I introduced my secret use of Big Data to describe Bankers Anonymous readers.  If readers click on a link to Amazon through my book reviews, any purchases they make get tracked by Amazon – and I get credited with an ‘advertising fee.’ [1] This past June 2013, based [&hellip

Why You Hate Your Bank

Why You Hate Your Bank

By The Banker | Blog Posts

Warning:  This is a story about customer service in the banking industry, so reader discretion is advised.  Do not read if you are prone to high blood pressure.  Also, this is not an apocryphal story.  This actually happened to me this week.[1] The Background to the Problem One of my businesses became inactive last year, [&hellip

The Importance of Real Rules Monopoly

The Importance of Real Rules Monopoly

By The Banker | Blog Posts

A central idea, the idée fixe of Bankers Anonymous, is that as a society we do a poor job of teaching about finance, a consequently poor job as individuals of learning about finance, and therefore we all suffer an inevitable tendency to make bad decisions, both personal and political, about finance. Sometime this Spring I [&hellip