Archive for the ‘Texas’ Category

Taxes Rant: Carried Interest Edition

Taxes Rant: Carried Interest Edition

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Taxes, Texas

Note: A version of this post appeared in the San Antonio Express News. Dear Money: I miss you so, so much. I recently mailed off – with deep feelings of loss – two of my biggest checks of the year: one for real estate taxes to the county where I live and the other to [&hellip

Stupid Smart People

Stupid Smart People

By The Banker | Blog Posts, How Not To Invest, Investing, Personal Finance, Texas

Note: A version of this post appeared in the San Antonio Express News My wife and I headed East on I-10 recently to visit our New York City friends Jay and Nina – another married couple and their kids – who now live in Houston. The conversation over the weekend turned toward their personal finances [&hellip

A Confusing Puzzle Made Simple - Retirement Plans

A Confusing Puzzle Made Simple – Retirement Plans

By The Banker | Blog Posts, How Not To Invest, Investing, Texas

A version of this post ran earlier in the San Antonio Express News I recently received in the mail retirement plan documents for a local employer’s 403B plan. I’m going to spend the first part of this column complaining about this 403B plan provider. Later, I am going to offer a better, simpler, version of [&hellip

Art Lessons For Business

Art Lessons For Business

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Texas

A version of this post ran in the San Antonio Express News You know what’s hard about producing art? Getting paid. I don’t usually turn to the art world for my lessons on business, but I’ve been thinking lately about San Antonio glass artist Justin Parr and what he’s been doing with the “Esferas Perdidas” [&hellip

Radio Appearance On The Cost Of Attracting NFL Team To Town

Radio Appearance On The Cost Of Attracting NFL Team To Town

By The Banker | Audio Posts, How Not To Invest, Texas

I participated in a radio discussion yesterday regarding on public radio KSTX ‘The Source,’ hosted by David Martin Davies, on the likely cost of attracting an NFL team, to move to San Antonio. NFL owners in the last few decades have come to expect extraordinary public subsidies for their privately owned businesses. I estimated earlier in [&hellip