On Housing, Part III - 7 Big Opportunities

On Housing, Part III – 7 Big Opportunities

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Personal Finance

As I wrote before, housing is a combination of necessity, consumption, and investment.  To the extent a house is also an investment, we should be clear-eyed about the risks. Despite the numerous risks of investing through home ownership – and acknowledging that it’s neither a slam dunk nor appropriate for everyone – I advocate long-term [&hellip

Book Review: The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope

Book Review: The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope

By The Banker | Book Reviews, Wall Street

My wicked-smaht friend Melissa just reviewed a book on her literary site  that I’ve long been meaning to review here.  The Way We Live Now, by Anthony Trollope is a must-read for people interested in finance, upper-class society, and the way history constantly rhymes with the present. Did you know that in 1875 Anthony Trollope [&hellip

Video: TEDTAlk on Philanthropy

Video: TEDTAlk on Philanthropy

By The Banker | Audio Posts, Video

In the spirit of my earlier posts on Philanthropy, I enjoyed this presentation, with its thought-provoking questions. Question #1: Can I make a difference? He offers this site as an innovative way to think about philanthropic giving, even on a modest salary: www.givingwhatwecan.org Question #2: Do I have to give up my career? He argues [&hellip

On Housing, Part II - The Risks

On Housing, Part II – The Risks

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Personal Finance

In my previous post on housing I posit that the money we spend on housing may be thought of as fulfilling a combination of functions – namely necessity, consumption, and investment.  To do the investment part right, we should try to separate in a clear-headed way which function we’re spending money on.  Housing as an [&hellip

Data Analysis: Understanding Bankers Anonymous Readers

Data Analysis: Understanding Bankers Anonymous Readers

By The Banker | Blog Posts

Data, Data, Everywhere, but Not a Thought to Think. We live in a data-rich, analysis-poor world. What do I mean by that? TEDtalk-type folks tell us we create more data every moment than we know what to do with, that the data created in just the last 10 years overwhelms the data generated in the [&hellip