Posts Tagged ‘estate taxes’

Pretending Economic Policy Matters

Pretending Economic Policy Matters

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Personal Finance, Taxes, Texas, Wall Street

This Presidential election is absolutely not about economic policy. To pretend that you’re choosing your presidential candidate in the 2016 election based on economic policy – after this campaign season – is as absurd as claiming you used to purchase Playboy for the articles. Even so, let’s pretend for a moment that this election was [&hellip

DAF and Dying With A Surplus

DAF and Dying With A Surplus

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Investing, Texas

If you face the high-quality problem of finishing your life with too much money, you’ve probably already figured out that three groups, and three groups only, get your surplus: The government, your family, and your preferred charities. Of these, we typically all agree about leaving the lowest legal amount to the government. Then we face [&hellip

Hillary Clinton Tax Proposals

Hillary Clinton Tax Proposals

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Taxes, Texas

Last week I described future Republican Presidential nominee Jeb Bush’s tax proposals. This week, for balance, I will review future Democratic Presidential nominee Clinton’s tax proposals. Now, before you #FeelTheBern folks write to tell me about your favorite candidate’s chances in the Democratic primaries, I should say the following: Every letter you write me must [&hellip

The View From The Fiscal Gorge

The View From The Fiscal Gorge

By The Banker | Blog Posts

Happy Fiscal Gorge[1] Day! Guess who’s really happy from last night’s tax deal? Heirs, financiers, and people who live off their piles of money. Guess who’s not saddened by the Fiscal Gorge tax deal? The top 2% of earners that Obama spent his campaign promising would pay a larger share of federal taxes if he [&hellip

A Tax Proposal Worth Considering

A Tax Proposal Worth Considering

By The Banker | Blog Posts

The Center for American Progress (CAP) recently published a summary description of their proposals for addressing tax and spending policy, in the light of the ‘Fiscal Cliff,’ Simpson-Bowles, and the ongoing flustercluck of fiscal policy negotiations going on before January 1, 2013. Their summary report is as good as anything I’ve seen yet in terms [&hellip