Posts Tagged ‘inequality’

Why Wealth Inequality Matters - Plus CEO Pay Again

Why Wealth Inequality Matters – Plus CEO Pay Again

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Inequality, Texas

Last week I wrote about the sharp rise in super-manager pay throughout the 1990s, and specifically a funny (to me) quirk of stock option awards and bad math by corporate boards. The good news is I have a bunch more thoughts on the rise of super-manager pay and – but wait – Wait — WAIT! [&hellip

CEO Pay-Rise: A Silly Math Mistake

CEO Pay-Rise: A Silly Math Mistake

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Texas

An economics paper published last month in the National Bureau of Economic Research really fascinates me. Maybe that’s because I’m a fundamentally boring person? No, that’s not the main point. Economists Kelly Shue and Richard Townsend set out to explain the sharp rise of executive pay in the ten-year period 1992 to 2001. Think of [&hellip

On

On “The Economy” (If Such A Thing Exists)

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Inequality, Texas

One of the odd things about listening to Republican candidates for president is their insistence on describing the ‘weak economy’ or the ‘anemic recovery’ of the Obama Presidency. For which they propose a new approach, naturally. And obviously we understand why they say that. But just to be clear – that’s crazy talk. “The US [&hellip

Minimum Wage - Reasons To Be Cautious

Minimum Wage – Reasons To Be Cautious

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Texas

I’m not a mean-spirited person (at least not after I’ve had my morning coffee) but I worry that writing about recent minimum wage law changes could lead some friends to accuse me of heartlessness. I don’t mean to be heartless. The Los Angeles City Council recently voted 14-1 to raise the employee minimum wage in [&hellip

Kooky and Good Idea To Address Inequality

Kooky and Good Idea To Address Inequality

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Inequality

UK economist Anthony Atkinson published a book “Inequality: What Can Be Done?” in May of this year in which he proposes radical solutions to the most pressing financial problem of our time. I thought I’d heard all the important arguments on the topic, and then this economist comes along with a totally bonkers idea that [&hellip