Archive for the ‘Blog Posts’ Category

My Take on the Fiduciary Rule

My Take on the Fiduciary Rule

By The Banker | Blog Posts, How Not To Invest, Investing, Personal Finance, Texas, Wall Street

Among the best known of the Obama-era financial regulations is the so-called “Fiduciary Duty Rule” for investment advisers of retirement accounts. It declared that financial advisers for retirement accounts act as “fiduciaries” and therefore must offer conflict-free advice, avoid misleading statements, receive no more than reasonable compensation, and always act taking into account the client’s […]

The Border Wall Nonsense

The Border Wall Nonsense

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Texas

Invasive vines creep over the hedge separating my house from my next-door neighbor’s house. Sometimes those vines even touch trees in my yard. That’s why every night I stand on the top of a giant ladder, shouting into a megaphone, straight into their yard. “You’re going to cut those weeds right now! And then you’ll […]

TX Rainy Day Fund Proposal

TX Rainy Day Fund Proposal

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Texas

Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar proposed last month significant shifts in management of Texas’ Rainy Day Fund, and it’s all shockingly sensible. I say shockingly not as a diss against Hegar, but rather because my usual stance with respect to fiscal prudence among government leaders is an exasperated shrug. It’s usually “Oh, they went and did […]

A Budget Discussion Thats Not Stoopid

A Budget Discussion Thats Not Stoopid

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Taxes

As of last week, your income taxes are all filed. Congrats! Or, like me, you got an extension. Boo! In either case, it’s a good week to think about what our tax money bought this year. And since we’ve all been promised federal tax reform this spring or summer from a unified legislative and executive […]

100 Year Bonds In The Trump Era

100 Year Bonds In The Trump Era

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Texas, Wall Street

The United States does not currently issue bonds with maturities longer than 30 years, but the idea of super long-dated national debt is back in the air. Long-dated, as in bonds due in 100 years. One reason 100-year bonds are kind of neat is that nobody alive right now ever needs to worry about paying […]