Archive for the ‘Blog Posts’ Category

Never Buy Gold

Never Buy Gold

By The Banker | Blog Posts, How Not To Invest, Investing, Personal Finance, Texas, Wall Street

A significant portion of the Financial Infotainment Industrial Complex dedicates itself to selling you gold, as an investment. Resist. I have already written about the three other horsemen of your personal financial apocalypse: variable annuities, times shares, and bitcoins. The commonality of these four horseman is that they are sold to credible people as “investments” […]

IFTTT with Qapital

IFTTT with Qapital

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Personal Finance, Texas

Transitioning from being a paycheck-to-paycheck person to a person with actual accumulated savings in the bank is one of the classic problems of personal finance. Maybe you got there easily, as soon as you started earning money. If so, you are not the majority. Some never get there. A large number of people are in […]

My Take on the Fiduciary Rule

My Take on the Fiduciary Rule

By The Banker | Blog Posts, How Not To Invest, Investing, Personal Finance, Texas, Wall Street

Among the best known of the Obama-era financial regulations is the so-called “Fiduciary Duty Rule” for investment advisers of retirement accounts. It declared that financial advisers for retirement accounts act as “fiduciaries” and therefore must offer conflict-free advice, avoid misleading statements, receive no more than reasonable compensation, and always act taking into account the client’s […]

The Border Wall Nonsense

The Border Wall Nonsense

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Texas

Invasive vines creep over the hedge separating my house from my next-door neighbor’s house. Sometimes those vines even touch trees in my yard. That’s why every night I stand on the top of a giant ladder, shouting into a megaphone, straight into their yard. “You’re going to cut those weeds right now! And then you’ll […]

TX Rainy Day Fund Proposal

TX Rainy Day Fund Proposal

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Texas

Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar proposed last month significant shifts in management of Texas’ Rainy Day Fund, and it’s all shockingly sensible. I say shockingly not as a diss against Hegar, but rather because my usual stance with respect to fiscal prudence among government leaders is an exasperated shrug. It’s usually “Oh, they went and did […]