Video: The Compound Interest Formula - A Rainbow Bridge

Video: The Compound Interest Formula – A Rainbow Bridge

By The Banker | Audio Posts, Investing, Personal Finance, Video

In my ongoing, epic, lonely, quest to convince an indifferent world that the compound interest formula will  clothe the downtrodden, feed the grey whales, prevent the coughing sickness and otherwise save the planet, I offer this video explanation for what the compound interest formula does.     I’m teaching personal finance to college kids this [&hellip

Book Review: The Money Mentor by Tad Crawford

Book Review: The Money Mentor by Tad Crawford

By The Banker | Book Reviews, Personal Finance

I expected to hate The Money Mentor: A Tale of Financial Freedom by Tad Crawford.  Crawford wrote this modern-day fable aimed most at people who struggle with high-interest debt.  The Money Mentor is a modern-day version of George Clason’s The Richest Man in Babylon. We meet the narrator/protagonist Iris, a 20-something wannabe dancer in the [&hellip

Missing the point, over at the NYTimes

Missing the point, over at the NYTimes

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Inequality

James Stewart writes an interesting piece this morning on a 55 year old NYC attorney who recently declared bankruptcy, after earning in the $375-500K range for the past 20 years for a series of high-powered New York law firms. Stewart’s analysis is that: 1. Being a non-equity partner attorney is tough these days, and 2. [&hellip

Book Review: I.O.U. by John Lanchester

Book Review: I.O.U. by John Lanchester

By The Banker | Book Reviews, Wall Street

In reading and reviewing John Lanchester’s I.O.U. – Why Everyone Owes Everyone and No One Can Pay I continue my quest for the best contemporary histories of the 2008 Crisis. One reason to study and understand a crisis like 2008 is to avoid repeating it.  George Santayana’s pithy justification for historical review – “those who [&hellip

Reinhart Rogoff and Political Tribalism

Reinhart Rogoff and Political Tribalism

By The Banker | Blog Posts

I wrote a few days back about how Reinhart and Rogoff’s serious, academic, review of past and prospective debt restructurings seemed to provide policy support for financial repression – such as capital controls, fixed currency regimes, highly regulated banks, and hidden taxes on savings through forced public pension investments. This post highlights one of my [&hellip