Posts Tagged ‘tax policy’

Clinton Proposal on Capital Gains Tax: I Like It

Clinton Proposal on Capital Gains Tax: I Like It

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Taxes, Texas

I’ve written before about carried interest taxes, estate taxes, and real estate tax policy using the contrasting lens of what is ‘fair to me,’ (typically, If I don’t have to pay it, it’s fair to me) versus what is ‘fair to society,’ (My attempt to take the broad view, even if it hurts me personally.) [&hellip

The Problem of Tax Code Complexity

The Problem of Tax Code Complexity

By The Banker | Blog Posts, Taxes

With the nightmare US debt default temporarily avoided, let’s review some basics. The budgetary responsibility of the US Congress has two parts: 1. Set spending levels (money outflow) and 2. Set taxation levels (money inflow) Congressional rhetoric in the recent nonsense weeks mostly focused on spending (money outflow), whereas the harder but more meaningful discussion [&hellip

The View From The Fiscal Gorge

The View From The Fiscal Gorge

By The Banker | Blog Posts

Happy Fiscal Gorge[1] Day! Guess who’s really happy from last night’s tax deal? Heirs, financiers, and people who live off their piles of money. Guess who’s not saddened by the Fiscal Gorge tax deal? The top 2% of earners that Obama spent his campaign promising would pay a larger share of federal taxes if he [&hellip

Sheldon Adelson Should Bet Even More on the GOP

Sheldon Adelson Should Bet Even More on the GOP

By The Banker | Blog Posts

Two things you can count on with a casino entrepreneur like Sheldon Adelson: he knows the odds better than you do, and the house always wins. In a recent Wall Street Journal interview, Sands Casino owner Adelson shares his left-of-center political beliefs, including support for abortion rights and stem-cell research, the DREAM act, and socialized [&hellip

A Tax Proposal Worth Considering

A Tax Proposal Worth Considering

By The Banker | Blog Posts

The Center for American Progress (CAP) recently published a summary description of their proposals for addressing tax and spending policy, in the light of the ‘Fiscal Cliff,’ Simpson-Bowles, and the ongoing flustercluck of fiscal policy negotiations going on before January 1, 2013. Their summary report is as good as anything I’ve seen yet in terms [&hellip